Topic: WikiLeaks

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bytesforall (Shahzad Ahmad)

...and how nicely the question on #wikileaks was diverted by UK parliamentarian ;) @uradn #igf11

2 years 46 weeks ago

Associated blog posts

Blog post included here have used #WikiLeaks in their title

Now that the WikiLeaks hype has settled, it is a good time to look objectively at its impact and consider what we can learn. The exposure of US diplomatic cables has revealed a highly professional diplomatic service.

American diplomats write good policy analysis, clearly distinguishing facts and judgments. The reports are concise, and well-written with good humour. The early...

Originally blogged by: Jovan Kurbalija
3 years 28 weeks ago View original post.

While we are discussing the thousands of diplomatic telegrams revealed by WikiLeaks, it is important to review the leaking (intentional or otherwise) of a few other telegrams that have shaped diplomatic history.  The Ems telegram, leaked by Prussia’s Prince Otto Von Bismarck, led to war between France and Prussia and ultimately to the unification of Germany in 1871...

Originally blogged by: Jovan Kurbalija
3 years 34 weeks ago View original post.

CableGate puts into sharper focus the modern relevance of one of the oldest survival principles in nature “to see and not be seen”. Today, based on an informal  “Internet social contract”, the deal is that we “see” much more, but we also accept being “seen” more than ever before. This tacit Internet deal is under a lot of pressure. We are...

Originally blogged by: Jovan Kurbalija
3 years 36 weeks ago View original post.

WikiLeaks is probably the strongest attack on diplomacy as a way of managing global affairs. Paradoxically, it may trigger open and honest discussion about its future role. This is the good news….

We need diplomacy now more than ever before. The contemporary world is so interdependent that its conflicts can no longer be resolved by military force.  The geo-strategic landscape...

Originally blogged by: Jovan Kurbalija
3 years 37 weeks ago View original post.

Like everything else, confidentiality is affected by the law of inflation. The multiplication of the inflated object (usually money) reduces its value. There are various reasons behind the growing number of confidential documents in diplomatic services. Aside from the fact that the sheer volume of one’s reporting is very often a major career ‘barometer’, diplomats often assign...

Originally blogged by: Jovan Kurbalija
3 years 37 weeks ago View original post.

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